Hot Best Seller

The Iliad

Availability: Ready to download

In a companion volume to his award-winning adaptation of The Odyssey, the incomparable graphic novelist Gareth Hinds masterfully adapts Homer's classic wartime epic. More than three thousand years ago, two armies faced each other in an epic battle that rewrote history and came to be known as the Trojan War. The Iliad, Homer's legendary account of this nine-year ordeal, is In a companion volume to his award-winning adaptation of The Odyssey, the incomparable graphic novelist Gareth Hinds masterfully adapts Homer's classic wartime epic. More than three thousand years ago, two armies faced each other in an epic battle that rewrote history and came to be known as the Trojan War. The Iliad, Homer's legendary account of this nine-year ordeal, is considered the greatest war story of all time and one of the most important works of Western literature. In this stunning graphic novel adaptation -- a thoroughly researched and artfully rendered masterwork -- renowned illustrator Gareth Hinds captures all the grim glory of Homer's epic. Dynamic illustrations take readers directly to the plains of Troy, into the battle itself, and lay bare the complex emotions of the men, women, and gods whose struggles fueled the war and determined its outcome. This companion volume to Hinds's award-winning adaptation of The Odyssey features notes, maps, a cast of characters, and other tools to help readers understand all the action and drama of Homer's epic.


Compare

In a companion volume to his award-winning adaptation of The Odyssey, the incomparable graphic novelist Gareth Hinds masterfully adapts Homer's classic wartime epic. More than three thousand years ago, two armies faced each other in an epic battle that rewrote history and came to be known as the Trojan War. The Iliad, Homer's legendary account of this nine-year ordeal, is In a companion volume to his award-winning adaptation of The Odyssey, the incomparable graphic novelist Gareth Hinds masterfully adapts Homer's classic wartime epic. More than three thousand years ago, two armies faced each other in an epic battle that rewrote history and came to be known as the Trojan War. The Iliad, Homer's legendary account of this nine-year ordeal, is considered the greatest war story of all time and one of the most important works of Western literature. In this stunning graphic novel adaptation -- a thoroughly researched and artfully rendered masterwork -- renowned illustrator Gareth Hinds captures all the grim glory of Homer's epic. Dynamic illustrations take readers directly to the plains of Troy, into the battle itself, and lay bare the complex emotions of the men, women, and gods whose struggles fueled the war and determined its outcome. This companion volume to Hinds's award-winning adaptation of The Odyssey features notes, maps, a cast of characters, and other tools to help readers understand all the action and drama of Homer's epic.

30 review for The Iliad

  1. 5 out of 5

    Amalia Gavea

    ‘’How I wish that Discord could be banished from the world.’’ There have been many novels that chose the greatest war story of all time as their setting. Trilogies, plays, you name it. This graphic novel by Gareth Hinds is probably the best adaptation I’ve ever encountered. Narrating the rhapsodies of Homer’s immortal epic is no easy task. However, Hinds succeeds in transferring the Trojan War in the contemporary art of the Graphic novel and retaining the beauty of the Homeric language and the vi ‘’How I wish that Discord could be banished from the world.’’ There have been many novels that chose the greatest war story of all time as their setting. Trilogies, plays, you name it. This graphic novel by Gareth Hinds is probably the best adaptation I’ve ever encountered. Narrating the rhapsodies of Homer’s immortal epic is no easy task. However, Hinds succeeds in transferring the Trojan War in the contemporary art of the Graphic novel and retaining the beauty of the Homeric language and the violent atmosphere of the bloody dispute between the Achaeans and the Trojans. I was impressed by the style of the illustrations, the way the Greek deities were depicted, the clothes, the weaponry, the architecture. Every characteristic of the Bronze Age is brilliantly portrayed. The impressive moments are many. The fury of Achilles, the interventions of the Olympians, Helen’s guilt, Agamemnon’s arrogance, Hector’s despair. The futility of a war for power and greed, the sacrilege, the dubious glory. Brilliant translation, extraordinary artwork. Imagine a universe where Homer returns to life, in our world, and decides to become a Graphic Novel artist. This would be his ‘’new’’ Iliad. Thank you, Gareth Hinds. Many thanks to Candlewick Press and NetGalley for the ARC in exchange for an honest review. My reviews can also be found on https://theopinionatedreaderblog.word...

  2. 4 out of 5

    PattyMacDotComma

    4.5★ “This is not the story of the Trojan War. Or at least not the whole story. . . . The war was fought over a woman. Or possibly an apple, or a lot of gold, or control of trade routes. Here’s what supposedly happened: the two mightiest gods, Zeus and Poseidon, were both attracted to a sea-nymph named Thetis.” This is a long, full-on graphic novel, not a short comic book. I have not compared it to official versions – I can’t say original, because this was written around the 12th century BCE (befor 4.5★ “This is not the story of the Trojan War. Or at least not the whole story. . . . The war was fought over a woman. Or possibly an apple, or a lot of gold, or control of trade routes. Here’s what supposedly happened: the two mightiest gods, Zeus and Poseidon, were both attracted to a sea-nymph named Thetis.” This is a long, full-on graphic novel, not a short comic book. I have not compared it to official versions – I can’t say original, because this was written around the 12th century BCE (before common/current era) – but there is poetry quoted and the language used by the characters is written in a manner that suggests historic rather than modern times. I make no attempt to summarise the story, other than to say it includes all the elements of a good dramatic action adventure: romance, jealousy, heroes, kings, gods and goddesses, magic and weakness. Oh yes, and war, not to forget the Trojan War. I’ve captured a few of the illustrations, which are done as coloured drawings, some very detailed and some more sketchy, particularly those of the mythical gods and goddesses and Dream. Picture of some important Trojans (note the warriors with and without their helmets) and some gods The introduction tells us why Agamemnon and Achilles are quarrelling and shows what happens next. “Chryses prayed to Apollo for retribution, and the god heard him. Down he came from the heights of Mount Olympus, the arrows of disease and death rattling in his quiver like thunder, and darkness following in his footsteps.” Picture of Agamemnon and Achilles, head-to-head, Chryses praying, and Apollo striding down to mix things up some more Achilles is the son of Thetis, a beautiful sea goddess. and he begs her to go to Zeus and ask him to intervene. He’s the chief/king of the gods, after all, and he has always had a soft spot for Thetis (to put it politely). Hera, Zeus’s wife, is well aware of his weaknesses. Pictures of Hera (pink) jealous of Thetis (aqua) who is begging Zeus “I saw you bow your head to that sea-trollop just now.* What have you promised her?” At the bottom of that page is this footnote: “* If Zeus bowed his head when making a promise, it was said to be an unbreakable vow.” There are similar notations here and there, as needed, plus extensive notes at the end of the book. You can see even from these small examples, the difference between the illustrations of the gods and the mortals, which helps keep them straight. I haven’t read each panel thoroughly, but I can see how much attention to detail there is, and how easy it would be to encourage otherwise less-interested readers to engage with reading some of these old tales. (I suppose Brad Pitt and Eric Bana and the film probably attracted some interest too.) There are plenty of graphic bloody battles. Battle illustration. Note the gods each cheering for their own sides in the background on the top right! Here’s a bit more of what’s available in this publication. A map. Map of the armies and where they came from I realise you can’t see this here, but this will give you an idea of the details included. The first of several page-by-page notes to accompany the illustrated text The lengthy author's note adds history and context. There is also a good bibliography, which includes this interesting link, if you’re interested. http://age-of-bronze.com/Cartoonistin... Thanks to NetGalley and Candlewick Press for the preview from which I’ve copied a few illustrations.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Bradley

    I don't know how many of you out there went to Sunday School as children, but I remember having to read these god-awful children's books with truly ugly art depicting bible tales. Watercolor, with bland-as-hell poses and expressions for everyone... all so worthless that I wished they had just done without the pictures altogether. Maybe the bland tales, too. "But wait," you say, "This is supposed to be the Iliad! It's exciting and tragic and it has gods and heroes and that damn horse!" Yeah, well, I don't know how many of you out there went to Sunday School as children, but I remember having to read these god-awful children's books with truly ugly art depicting bible tales. Watercolor, with bland-as-hell poses and expressions for everyone... all so worthless that I wished they had just done without the pictures altogether. Maybe the bland tales, too. "But wait," you say, "This is supposed to be the Iliad! It's exciting and tragic and it has gods and heroes and that damn horse!" Yeah, well, this is the book where even great tales go to die. If you want to read the original, READ THE ORIGINAL. Or as in my case, the translation to the original. Go for the poetry one or the prose one. I don't care. It's better than this. Even the text manages to draw out the dull. And if you wanted a great comic portrayal, go watch that horse-dung of a movie that came out in the oughts. It really was comic. And at least it didn't have ALL THESE FOOTNOTES. You know the old adage, a picture paints a thousand words? Well, the author ignores the great thousands of words and leaves them in the comic and ignores the possible brilliance of the art that could have replaced certain scenes. And then, instead of focusing on the really iconic scenes to great benefit, he gives a lot of space to the random dead that we can list for hours in the original text. I can kinda appreciate that in a "oh, cool, I can't believe he did that," kind of way, but in actuality, I was thinking, "oh, damn, that really, really could have been left out." My boredom got bored. Do not read. This is a public service announcement. *apologies to the artist*

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jane

    Wow. There is a lot going on in this book. Like a super lot. For me, someone who is not well-versed in the Iliad or Greek mythology, this was just too dense. Reading this felt a bit like trying to watch all 8 seasons of Game of Thrones condensed into one season. The result is a massive info dump of character names and relationships and that doesn't leave a ton of room for engaging story. I chose to read this because I thought it would be an easier way to familiarize myself with the stories. I th Wow. There is a lot going on in this book. Like a super lot. For me, someone who is not well-versed in the Iliad or Greek mythology, this was just too dense. Reading this felt a bit like trying to watch all 8 seasons of Game of Thrones condensed into one season. The result is a massive info dump of character names and relationships and that doesn't leave a ton of room for engaging story. I chose to read this because I thought it would be an easier way to familiarize myself with the stories. I think the opposite is true. This material will be much more enjoyed by those who already have some understanding of the story. My 10-year-old nephew who has been absorbing these stories since he was about 6 would LOVE this. He already knows the background information, so reading this would not nearly be the same struggle for him. I think this is well-suited for that kind of reader. The art here is good, and I appreciate the efforts Hinds made to try to differentiate between the characters. I also quite like the notes throughout that explain certain words or ideas. Overall, I give this 3 stars, but think that people familiar with the story will like this much more than I did. Thank you to NetGalley and Candlewick Press for providing me with a DRC of this book.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    I typically love mythology, especially Greek mythology, but this gets bogged down by too many details. I don't need to know the 50 people each character killed in battle and who each of those people's dads were. I often found myself skimming through the book to finish. After dragging through 272 pages, the story of the Trojan war isn't finished either. It ends where the Iliad ends, after Achilles and Hector's final battle. It drags on for too long after that, giving the book an unsatisfying endi I typically love mythology, especially Greek mythology, but this gets bogged down by too many details. I don't need to know the 50 people each character killed in battle and who each of those people's dads were. I often found myself skimming through the book to finish. After dragging through 272 pages, the story of the Trojan war isn't finished either. It ends where the Iliad ends, after Achilles and Hector's final battle. It drags on for too long after that, giving the book an unsatisfying ending. The art reminds me of textbook art. Received a review copy from Candlewick Press and NetGalley. All thoughts are my own and in no way influenced by the aforementioned.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Tatiana

    Yeah, I definitely wouldn't have gotten through this one in the original format. Hinds cut out a lot of stuff, but still 70% of the story was dedicated to describing which warrior died and how, plus what was plundered and fought over, and what was sacrificed to one god or another. I skimmed over those parts. Even in such abridgement, I did get a good picture of Greek life though. The emphasis on warrior "glory” (i. e. desecrating enemy corpses, stealing armor off the dead bodies, raping and ensla Yeah, I definitely wouldn't have gotten through this one in the original format. Hinds cut out a lot of stuff, but still 70% of the story was dedicated to describing which warrior died and how, plus what was plundered and fought over, and what was sacrificed to one god or another. I skimmed over those parts. Even in such abridgement, I did get a good picture of Greek life though. The emphasis on warrior "glory” (i. e. desecrating enemy corpses, stealing armor off the dead bodies, raping and enslaving women, fighting over every little offense), the view of women as property, etc. . (This last part highlighted to me exactly why Barker was compelled to give voice to the women of Trojan War the The Silence of the Girls. Too bad she failed so spectacularly at doing it.) The most interesting for me was trying to understand the interplay of gods and "fate." I am not sure I fully comprehend why the gods even wasted SO MUCH time interfering, if ultimately they all knew what the end would be. Was it just for kicks? To distract themselves from the boredom of their immortal lives? And finally, I see why the notion of Achilles/Patroclus romance is so irresistible. By far the most emotional part of The Iliad was the one of Achilles throwing himself around in grief after Patroclus's death. I understand this particular ship much better now.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Trish

    *sighs* I LOVE the Iliad and the Odyssey so when I saw this on a friend's timeline here, I requested the ARC from Netgalley and was really happy when I got approved. That happiness died a very quick but unfortunately still very painful death. The story is almost as old as literature itself. An epic confrontation between several Greek city states (led by Agamemnon and his brother, helped by lesser lords) against the legendary kingdom of Troy. Helen and Paris, Hector and Priam, Achilles and Patroclus *sighs* I LOVE the Iliad and the Odyssey so when I saw this on a friend's timeline here, I requested the ARC from Netgalley and was really happy when I got approved. That happiness died a very quick but unfortunately still very painful death. The story is almost as old as literature itself. An epic confrontation between several Greek city states (led by Agamemnon and his brother, helped by lesser lords) against the legendary kingdom of Troy. Helen and Paris, Hector and Priam, Achilles and Patroclus, a host of Greek gods, Odysseus, the famous horse ... you know. The aspects of this epic story are myriad and awesome so I thought reading bout it in a more compact form and illustrated, too, would be cool. Sadly, that was not the case. The art was ... maybe not exactly bad but too simple. Like one of those very old picture books explaining difficult scientific or historical matters to children. It wasn't ugly but it was bland - from the lack of actual backgrounds to the lack of facial expressions or body language. Moreover, while the story here is close to the source material, the characterizations were so annoying (especially the gods) and the dialogues so boring that I found myself skimming the text. But I also started flying through the images pretty soon as there were no great details or anything exciting/interesting. In short: I'm glad I got an ARC because I'd be quite angry if I had spent money on this.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Lou

    Homer's epic war poem The Iliad, set in ancient Greece, is one of the most revered classics of all time, and it's quite a tough read for many, so I was excited to discover this graphic novel version which I thought would be especially perfect for introducing youngsters to Homer's works. However, I'm afraid there were a number of issues. It was very difficult to read as the words ran into one another, and I felt describing it as a graphic novel was a bit of a misrepresentation; it's more accurate Homer's epic war poem The Iliad, set in ancient Greece, is one of the most revered classics of all time, and it's quite a tough read for many, so I was excited to discover this graphic novel version which I thought would be especially perfect for introducing youngsters to Homer's works. However, I'm afraid there were a number of issues. It was very difficult to read as the words ran into one another, and I felt describing it as a graphic novel was a bit of a misrepresentation; it's more accurately described as pretty much the entire tale in writing with a few accompanying illustrations which was not what I chose to read this for. It's simply too wordy to be called a graphic novel, and that, of course, defeats the purpose. The inclusion of maps and charts was a nice touch and much appreciated but with all of the formatting issues, this was too messy to enjoy. I would like to think that the finalised version will have all of the problems resolved or there are going to be some rather unhappy readers. There were also far more characters than the usual telling of the story which isn't ideal and will almost certainly be off-putting to many. If I, a reasonably astute reader, have problems engaging with this then those that are younger are likely to have a similar problem. I'm also, sadly, not a fan of the artwork. A great concept but poor execution. Many thanks to Candlewick for an ARC.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly Carrington-Fox

    It looks like an oldish book, with simple artwork (pencils, maybe?) and too much text. I love The Iliad and, although I think this graphic novel can be perfect for the youngsters to get to know the classic story, for me it was a little dissapointing. Don't expect something like 300, this is the story (not only the Trojan horse but the whole story) with drawings. I think it's great for aproaching to Homer's tale but not so much for people that have read the original many times, like myself.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jim Angstadt

    The Iliad Gareth Hinds (Goodreads Author) The basic story flow was well done and I have no quibbles with any omissions. In fact I view the brevity as a big plus. It can attract readers that may want a quick introduction to the story. Throughout the work, the graphics matched the flow of the story, and were helpful in expressing emotional content. There are three graphics at the end of "Book 2 - The Armies" that were very helpful in understanding the layout and battlefield of the two armies. I had n The Iliad Gareth Hinds (Goodreads Author) The basic story flow was well done and I have no quibbles with any omissions. In fact I view the brevity as a big plus. It can attract readers that may want a quick introduction to the story. Throughout the work, the graphics matched the flow of the story, and were helpful in expressing emotional content. There are three graphics at the end of "Book 2 - The Armies" that were very helpful in understanding the layout and battlefield of the two armies. I had not seen this before, and it was a welcome surprise. The graphics of people and "gods" were, for me, a little too much of a caricature with exaggerated features and expressions. Certainly some exaggeration is appropriate, but overall it seemed excessive. As expected, the author had some very helpful notes at the end that included a map of where the combatants came from. I was a tiny bit disappointed with this work, perhaps because my hopes were so high.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Nikki "The Crazie Betty" V.

    DNF @ 27% I've read The Iliad so many times I can't count, and I was really excited to see the story put into graphic novel form. Unfortunately it just wasn't what I hoped or expected. What I ended up with was just a rehashing of the same story with a few drawn panes that felt hasty and unnecessary. I was hoping for more story through depiction of the art work and short thought/text bubbles like a typical graphic novel but it became apparent by a quarter through it that it brought nothing new to DNF @ 27% I've read The Iliad so many times I can't count, and I was really excited to see the story put into graphic novel form. Unfortunately it just wasn't what I hoped or expected. What I ended up with was just a rehashing of the same story with a few drawn panes that felt hasty and unnecessary. I was hoping for more story through depiction of the art work and short thought/text bubbles like a typical graphic novel but it became apparent by a quarter through it that it brought nothing new to the story and the art-work just didn't add enough to this to make it worth a read. Received via Netgalley and reviewed of my own accord.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Deb (Readerbuzz) Nance

    The Iliad is a cautionary tale for our time. It's an old story, from around the twelfth century B.C. and the reader can't help but feel glad we don't live in times such as these. Men grow angry with each other. They steal others' possessions. They seek vengeance for wrongs done to them. They attack each other, and they are vicious in their attacks, slashing with spears, brutally killing and maiming. They go to war against each other, and their wars last for years. They relish the cruelty they do The Iliad is a cautionary tale for our time. It's an old story, from around the twelfth century B.C. and the reader can't help but feel glad we don't live in times such as these. Men grow angry with each other. They steal others' possessions. They seek vengeance for wrongs done to them. They attack each other, and they are vicious in their attacks, slashing with spears, brutally killing and maiming. They go to war against each other, and their wars last for years. They relish the cruelty they do to others. They seek the help of the gods, who are just as petty and vindictive as the humans themselves. Yes, it's an old story, and the reader can't help but feel glad we don't live in times such as these, times we slash out at our opponents, times we delight in the cruelty we inflict on others, times we seek to build walls to protect ourselves, walls that oh-so-easily tumble and fall when the violence breaks out between conflicting tribes. This book is a cautionary tale.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lukasz

    Well written, accurate, faithful to the original. Unfprtunately, I actively disliked the art. I'm sure others will love it, though.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Liv | Books to Liv by

    Rating: 4 stars HEA: You know it’s not going to happen “I’ll never follow your orders again if you take Briseis. And should you lay claim to anything else of mine, your blood will soak my spear.” The Iliad has always been my favorite of the three classics. I don’t know exactly why, but I guess there’s something unequivocally sad and melancholic about Achilles’s character and the madness he experienced after Patroclus’s death. The same madness that drove him to kill Hector and fulfill that Rating: 4 stars HEA: You know it’s not going to happen “I’ll never follow your orders again if you take Briseis. And should you lay claim to anything else of mine, your blood will soak my spear.” The Iliad has always been my favorite of the three classics. I don’t know exactly why, but I guess there’s something unequivocally sad and melancholic about Achilles’s character and the madness he experienced after Patroclus’s death. The same madness that drove him to kill Hector and fulfill that atrocious prophecy. This graphic novel was interesting to the point I didn’t want it to end. Told in prose, lines and stunning drawings, it’s one of the most beautiful versions of the Iliad I have ever seen. I would recommend it to adults, but children as well. The drawings were engaging and those who portrayed Patroclus and Hector’s death were poignant and quietly eloquent. Loved the electronic version. I am wondering about the paperback… Thank you Netgalley and Candlewick Press for providing me this copy in exchange for an honest review. Thoughts and opinions are my own.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kailey (BooksforMKs)

    This graphic novel retelling of Homer's Iliad was not quite what I expected. It's much too word-heavy for a graphic novel, and I found myself bogged down in the text. Most of the panels have so much text that there is barely room for the artwork. And the artwork itself is nothing special. I didn't care for the cartoony look, and it just didn't grab my attention. It looks somewhat amateur, or hastily drawn. If you are a big fan of the Iliad, you might like this, but I did not enjoy reading it. Us This graphic novel retelling of Homer's Iliad was not quite what I expected. It's much too word-heavy for a graphic novel, and I found myself bogged down in the text. Most of the panels have so much text that there is barely room for the artwork. And the artwork itself is nothing special. I didn't care for the cartoony look, and it just didn't grab my attention. It looks somewhat amateur, or hastily drawn. If you are a big fan of the Iliad, you might like this, but I did not enjoy reading it. Usually I love classical literature, and I have read The Iliad before, so I was happy to be revisiting the story of the Trojan War with all the drama. But this book does not deliver drama. It feels stale and static, like the characters are all made of stone. Disappointed in this one. Disclaimer: I received an ecopy of this book from the publisher/author via NetGalley in exchange for a free and honest review. All the opinions stated here are my own true thoughts, and are not influenced by anyone.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ms. Yingling

    Long ago in Ancient Greece, a prince of Troy, Paris, steals the most beautiful woman in the world from another prince, Menelaus of Sparta. Unfortunately, when Menelaus won Helen as his bride, he made all the other Greek leaders swear allegiance to him. Paris' action puts the Greek war machine into motion, and soon Troy is besieged. This goes on for a very long time, and there is a lot of drama over whether men want to be there (Odysseus famously tries to get out of fighting), how the fighting sh Long ago in Ancient Greece, a prince of Troy, Paris, steals the most beautiful woman in the world from another prince, Menelaus of Sparta. Unfortunately, when Menelaus won Helen as his bride, he made all the other Greek leaders swear allegiance to him. Paris' action puts the Greek war machine into motion, and soon Troy is besieged. This goes on for a very long time, and there is a lot of drama over whether men want to be there (Odysseus famously tries to get out of fighting), how the fighting should go, and whether after almost ten years they should all give up. Lot of people die, in very gruesome ways, and a fair number of women are enslaved and treated horribly by all sides. There are heroes and villains on both sides, and the war is finally ended when the Trojans infiltrate the city inside a giant wooden horse, open the gates for the other forces, and finally take the Trojan stronghold. This classic epic tale, whether written by Homer or another Greek man by the same name in about the 8th century B.C. is a tale with which everyone should have a passing familiarity. Readers who like to read about war will find this especially appealing, as Homer describes everything in the most florid manner. Hinds sticks closely to the original text, cutting out a great deal because of the graphic novel format, but still preserving the arc of the plot, description, and the type of language found in most of the English language translations. ("Like reapers who start from either end of a rich man's field and with sharp scythes bring barley tumbling down in armfuls till their swaths unite, so the armies closed to cut each other down." page 105) The twist, of course, is the format. Full color illustrations capture the action, including some beheadings, with a yellow palette that reflects the sandy Greek landscape. The costumes and appearance of the characters is true to the descriptions in the original, and the style somewhere between classic book illustrations and cartoons. There is a lot of text, and the language is very descriptive, making this a good choice for high school students who want a more visual approach to this story but don't want to sacrifice details. Hinds' specialty is graphic adaptations of classics (Romeo and Juliet, Beowulf, King Lear), and this hefty tome would make the Greeks proud, since they valued retellings of stories. Hinds' research is documented in notes in the back, and the translations he consulted are discussed. Hand this one to high school students struggling to comprehend this for class, or for middle school students who want to look really smart! What I Really Think: This is a LOT of text for a graphic novel-- I don't see my middle schoolers checking this out at all. Homer's prose is rather deathly dull considering how full of action the story is, and had I written this, I would have pruned it quite a bit. The snobby former Latin teacher (my minor in college was Ancient Greek!) in me wants to complain that the story was based off of translations and not the original, but that's a pretty silly quibble! This is Hinds' style, and he has a point in wanting to preserve the original language-- I prefer stories to be updated with modern language that students can understand. I was probably scarred by the Good News Bible popular in my youth.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Bruce

    This is sort of a mixed bag. I really wouldn't call it a graphic novel--more like an illustrated story. You have the pictures that go along with the narrative describing what is happening. For me it was hard to get into.

  18. 4 out of 5

    B.A. Wilson

    I love this concept of telling the story of the Iliad using a graphic novel, but I confess that I did still struggle to push through this, often caught myself skimming, and probably didn’t absorb much of it. It wasn’t at all what I was expecting, as it has very text heavy panels and the art is a bit rough around the edges, with an almost biblical feel. It can be a challenging read in its original format, with all of the different characters. They did a good job of trying to include identifiers t I love this concept of telling the story of the Iliad using a graphic novel, but I confess that I did still struggle to push through this, often caught myself skimming, and probably didn’t absorb much of it. It wasn’t at all what I was expecting, as it has very text heavy panels and the art is a bit rough around the edges, with an almost biblical feel. It can be a challenging read in its original format, with all of the different characters. They did a good job of trying to include identifiers to help you recognize certain characters, and they even included a character key/chart at the start. However, if you aren’t the type to just memorize all the names, facts, and pictures, it’s a bit like information overload. You aren’t going to remember any of it when you actually need it. In other words, they did everything they could to help me successfully read this graphic novel, but I still fought against the archaic language and overwhelmingly quick introduction of characters whom I was just expected to know. The panels are very text heavy, and while I understand why, it became tiring. I think this is like a retelling of the Iliad with pictures, and I wanted a true graphic novel format, which might have been unreasonable of me. What I really hoped for, when I opened this one, was for the story to be broken down into easy to follow scenes and everyday language. But maybe I was asking for and expecting too much from this particular piece of literature. The original is a bear, and on some level, this graphic novel does make the story more readable and interesting. However, I’ve come to realize I’m just not that interested in reading this story again. It was painful and confusing enough the first time I read it in the full text version. I think what they did was try to stay true to the original, and while this would be handy in a school or research setting, when you are forced to read or study the original version, I didn’t enjoy revisiting this story as an adult. I just wanted to really be able to wrap my mind around it and enjoy the story, but I found it tedious and often confusing. Most of the time, I wasn’t sure who was who or what was really happening and why, which I hate to confess, since I’ve studied the original Iliad before (sorry, mom!). Thank you to Netgalley, and the publisher, for allowing me to read an advanced copy. This graphic novel will be available tomorrow, on March 12, 2019. If you are currently reading or studying The Iliad, then I definitely recommend this as a tool to help you better understand the literature. It would be absolutely great for that purpose. For all others, this one is for either big fans of ancient lit, or those who love to bury themselves in overwhelming details about characters and Gods. It’s definitely not for your average graphic novel reader, who will likely find this version to be tiresome. Pages: 272

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ivana de B.

    https://buriedinbookssite.wordpress.c... This is a retelling of The Iliad in form of a graphic novel. The author Gareth Hinds brings us once again to one of the most famous battles of all time. There is no need for me to summarise this graphic novel since the story is so well-known and well-loved. I immensely enjoyed the maps and the charts. They were very helpful in bringing the story closer to me. Also, the chart with all the characters at the beginning was incredible, it made it easy to visuali https://buriedinbookssite.wordpress.c... This is a retelling of The Iliad in form of a graphic novel. The author Gareth Hinds brings us once again to one of the most famous battles of all time. There is no need for me to summarise this graphic novel since the story is so well-known and well-loved. I immensely enjoyed the maps and the charts. They were very helpful in bringing the story closer to me. Also, the chart with all the characters at the beginning was incredible, it made it easy to visualise everything. I love how it was similar to a list of characters in a play!  The art was quite lovely. I really enjoyed it, above all else because it was so different from the other graphic novels I've read in the past. My only complain is that it appeared a bit grainy, but that must have been a problem with my e-arc.  However, all those things could not cloud the fact that I simply did not enjoy this graphic novel. I am actually a big fan od the Iliad and Achilles is one of my favorite characters in greek mythology, but I simply couldn't get into this novel. I received this book in exchange for an honest review.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Faith Hough

    Don't let the graphic novel format fool you into thinking this is a dumbed-down version of Homer's classic work. Rather, its gorgeous illustrations, maps, and character charts (the latter two are a brilliant addition) provide a new facet or two to the work, while still maintaining the same story, same gorgeous (albeit abridged) language, and plenty of the same epic violence. If your children are not ready for reading about spears through heads, bloody battles, and the like, then hold off on this Don't let the graphic novel format fool you into thinking this is a dumbed-down version of Homer's classic work. Rather, its gorgeous illustrations, maps, and character charts (the latter two are a brilliant addition) provide a new facet or two to the work, while still maintaining the same story, same gorgeous (albeit abridged) language, and plenty of the same epic violence. If your children are not ready for reading about spears through heads, bloody battles, and the like, then hold off on this. But if they're just about ready for Homer, try this first--it is much easier to keep track of which characters are which and how the events unfold with the visuals provided by illustration. And then find the audiobook of the original narrated by Dan Stevens so they can experience the language of Homer as generations have before them: recited by a great storyteller!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Alicia

    While any retelling, especially in a graphic novel format is always welcomed, I don't know why I wasn't as invested in the story as I truly wanted to know and understand more about The Iliad. Obviously much was cut and reformed to tell the story in this format, but there was an incongruousness to the text and the illustrations. The words and story were explaining the illustration. But the point is that the illustration is the action and the words move to add more instruction and background. They While any retelling, especially in a graphic novel format is always welcomed, I don't know why I wasn't as invested in the story as I truly wanted to know and understand more about The Iliad. Obviously much was cut and reformed to tell the story in this format, but there was an incongruousness to the text and the illustrations. The words and story were explaining the illustration. But the point is that the illustration is the action and the words move to add more instruction and background. They didn't mesh well and therefore, I spent more time looking at the illustrations alone, losing some of the idea of what The Iliad was about. There are several spreads that could be useful in a classroom, but I wouldn't necessarily hand this to someone wishing to "read" The Iliad, instead you might as well tackle the real thing.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Trish

    This was horrible. This was not what I was expecting from a graphic novel. It is essentially a book with random (bad) small pictures thrown into it. Not the traditional format of a graphic novel at all. This was just down right bad to read as an ebook as well. The writing was all messed up and sentences were mixing together so the story itself made no sense. Hopefully a print version of this will be a lot better. I liked the idea of making older stories easier to read in graphic novel form but t This was horrible. This was not what I was expecting from a graphic novel. It is essentially a book with random (bad) small pictures thrown into it. Not the traditional format of a graphic novel at all. This was just down right bad to read as an ebook as well. The writing was all messed up and sentences were mixing together so the story itself made no sense. Hopefully a print version of this will be a lot better. I liked the idea of making older stories easier to read in graphic novel form but this fell completely short of those expectations. Thank you to the publisher & Netgalley fod allowing me to read and review this book.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Holly

    *Physical ARC kindly provided by Candlewick Press* I think this could be a good way to reach new readers of the classic, but for me, it just didn't hit the mark. Maybe it was because the artwork wasn't in color (as I read the ARC), but something about it just didn't flow well. It was confusing at times, how it was written, and the characters were hard to tell apart (but that's just the bad luck of there being so many in The Illiad!). That war touched hundreds of lives, all because of the ficklene *Physical ARC kindly provided by Candlewick Press* I think this could be a good way to reach new readers of the classic, but for me, it just didn't hit the mark. Maybe it was because the artwork wasn't in color (as I read the ARC), but something about it just didn't flow well. It was confusing at times, how it was written, and the characters were hard to tell apart (but that's just the bad luck of there being so many in The Illiad!). That war touched hundreds of lives, all because of the fickleness of gods and men. And I enjoyed reading this new adaptation of it!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Leticia

    I haven't read The Iliad by Homer yet, but this seems to be an interesting adaptation, even if I think that the ratio of text and images wasn't always optimally balanced. I could imagine giving this graphic novel to teens as an introduction to the epic of Homer. I would like to thank NetGalley and Candlewick Press for providing me a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Bayneeta

    Really quite a wonderful adaptation of Homer's classic into a graphic novel format. I'm impressed.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Mateo

    I thought that it was a great book by Gareth Hinds and I really enjoyed it because I like a story that has drawings and people talking while the actual story was in like in the book it is about how the Achaeans are at war with the Trojans and it was very interesting and with the pictures I could imagine it .

  27. 5 out of 5

    Maggie Lalley

    This made me want to read the actual Iliad, and I plan to do so! As a graphic novel version of the Iliad the reader is taken into a visual world of the Battle of Troy. It starts off with a conflict between Achilles and Agamemnon, and follows the Greeks to the gates of Troy where they are met by the Trojan army led by Hector and Paris of Troy. This whole battle is because one of the Greeks wives ran away to be with Paris and because men are *overly* prideful sometimes the Greeks felt they needed This made me want to read the actual Iliad, and I plan to do so! As a graphic novel version of the Iliad the reader is taken into a visual world of the Battle of Troy. It starts off with a conflict between Achilles and Agamemnon, and follows the Greeks to the gates of Troy where they are met by the Trojan army led by Hector and Paris of Troy. This whole battle is because one of the Greeks wives ran away to be with Paris and because men are *overly* prideful sometimes the Greeks felt they needed to burn down Troy just to get Helen back. This is definitely something I would use in my classroom for a student who is interested in Greek mythology but a little young to fully understand the actual Iliad. I would also use this as a resource if I were doing a unit on Greek mythology for younger grades because the pictures hold a lot of the information and make the story very easy to understand! Absolutely loved this, I really want to read the Odyssey graphic novel now and read the actual Iliad and Odyssey!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Allie

    I feel like I would have enjoyed this better if I had read it in physical format instead of an e-book. I'll definitely be trying it out again once release day comes! Full Review Okay, so I'm honestly not sure if this review is going to be the best or not, but I'm going to do the best with what I can, so just bear with me. The reason I'm starting off my review like this is because this was literally the hardest book to read as an e-book... At least, the copy that I received from Netgalley was. The I feel like I would have enjoyed this better if I had read it in physical format instead of an e-book. I'll definitely be trying it out again once release day comes! Full Review Okay, so I'm honestly not sure if this review is going to be the best or not, but I'm going to do the best with what I can, so just bear with me. The reason I'm starting off my review like this is because this was literally the hardest book to read as an e-book... At least, the copy that I received from Netgalley was. The writing was all jumbled and there was hardly any organization to explain who was talking or which character was being talked about. That being said, I'm going to try to focus solely on the content so that this is a fair review because it's totally not the author's fault that the e-book was all wonky. First, the book itself wasn't entirely what I was expecting. I was expecting a graphic novel, like a comic. Instead, from what I can tell, at least, this is more like a book with illustrations, except the illustrations are in graphic novel form... If that makes sense? *shrugs* I did really like the artwork, though! The colors were beautiful and the style was really cool, though it could be kind of graphic at times. I also really liked the cliff notes for certain terms and references throughout the book. I'm a huge Greek mythology fan, so it was really cool to read the facts behind certain parts of the story. Along with that, I also loved the Historical Accuracy section in the back of the book! I really enjoyed learning the history behind the Iliad; I honestly didn't know that the Trojan war was a real event, so I thought learning that was really cool! All-in-all, I feel like I definitely would have enjoyed reading a finished physical copy of this book, but I did enjoy the story! I definitely recommend this if you're into Greek mythology or history, especially if you're trying to ease yourself into it. It really shows that Gareth Hinds put a lot of thought into the details of this book, and I would definitely be willing to give it another chance if it shows up at my local library one day. This book was just released on Tuesday, so if it sounds like something you'd like, be sure to check it out!

  29. 5 out of 5

    GONZA

    I liked this graphic novel enough, but I still prefer the original epic book, but if it takes a graphic novel to spread the Iliad, it is ok and I hope a lot of people would read this great story! Mi é piaciuta abbastanza questa graphic novel, anche se ovviamente preferisco l'epica originale, ma se servono i disegni per far leggere questa storia, ben venga! THANKS NETGALLEY FOR THE PREVIEW!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jill

    It is an excellent idea to turn such a complicated story into a graphic novel. The Iliad is Homer’s account of the final year of the Trojan War, marked by a ten-year siege of the city of Troy (Ilium) by the Achaeans (known to us now as the Greeks). The war was allegedly started over the beautiful Helen of Troy. As the author points out: “The Iliad . . . is considered the greatest war story of all time and one of the most important works of Western literature.” But because it is extremely complex, It is an excellent idea to turn such a complicated story into a graphic novel. The Iliad is Homer’s account of the final year of the Trojan War, marked by a ten-year siege of the city of Troy (Ilium) by the Achaeans (known to us now as the Greeks). The war was allegedly started over the beautiful Helen of Troy. As the author points out: “The Iliad . . . is considered the greatest war story of all time and one of the most important works of Western literature.” But because it is extremely complex, Hinds’ graphic rendition makes it much more accessible. In the last year of the Trojan War, King Agamemnon, leader of the Greeks, gets into a feud with his best warrior, Achilles. Once again, the conflict between them begins over a woman. Or more accurately, it is a conflict egged on by the gods, who play a large role in manipulating everybody on both sides. During the course of of the story, Homer fills us in on the cause of the war and many of the Greek legends about the siege. Then the epic takes up events prophesied for the future, although the narrative ends before these events take place. In this way, however, The Iliad relates a more or less complete tale of the entire Trojan War. Hinds does a great job keeping you apprised of who the characters are on both sides, as well as those behind the scenes on Mount Olympus, home of the gods. The story is interspersed with sidebars, aids, and maps, but it is the graphic art that makes the largest contribution. You get to “know” who the actors are not only by what they look like, but by each one’s distinctive clothes, shields, and armor. Notes at the end of the book give further illumination to the story and the background for it. The author also refashions translations of The Iliad into simpler and more modern prose, while occasionally retaining some of the poetry from the original. In this way Hines is able to demonstrate the power of Homer's original work, which dates from around the 8th century B.C., making it at least over 2,000 years old. In an Author’s Note at the end of the book, Hinds answers the question, “Why do we still read The Iliad? He sums up his answer as: “We can experience The Iliad as a timeless tale of the courage, heroism, vanity, pettiness, and mortality we all share, and as a way to understand the history of Western civilization. Either way, it’s a great story.” Evaluation: This book would be perfect for anyone - especially those in school - having to, or wanting to, tackle The Iliad. (Recommended audience is age 10 through adult.) The dynamic and expressive pictures and understandable text may convince many readers to turn to the original. Even if not, they will get a new understanding of the many historical and philosophical issues revealed in Homer’s original epic. Hinds’ research is hard to fault, and he is well deserving of the acclaim he has received for his other graphic adaptations, including The Odyssey and Beowulf, inter alia.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.