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The King's Justice

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Young Kelson Haldane, King of Gwynedd, heir to both royal and Deryni magical powers, was still no match for ex-Archbishop Loris and the Pretender Queen Caitrin who sought his death. Yet, he raised an army against them both, knowing that honor made defeat impossible....


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Young Kelson Haldane, King of Gwynedd, heir to both royal and Deryni magical powers, was still no match for ex-Archbishop Loris and the Pretender Queen Caitrin who sought his death. Yet, he raised an army against them both, knowing that honor made defeat impossible....

30 review for The King's Justice

  1. 4 out of 5

    Gary Sundell

    The second book in the second trilogy featuring Kelson Haldane. The Meagan uprising continues from the prior book. King Kelson is ready to lead his army to put down thd rebellion. I love the characters. Deryni magic is considered evil by the Church. Former Archbishop Loris has joined the Mearan pretender in the rebellion. I really hate Loris. There are some really tough scenes in this book. This series should be read in publication order for readers picking it up for the first time. I first read The second book in the second trilogy featuring Kelson Haldane. The Meagan uprising continues from the prior book. King Kelson is ready to lead his army to put down thd rebellion. I love the characters. Deryni magic is considered evil by the Church. Former Archbishop Loris has joined the Mearan pretender in the rebellion. I really hate Loris. There are some really tough scenes in this book. This series should be read in publication order for readers picking it up for the first time. I first read this when it was released in HC years ago. It still packs an emotional wallop.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kat Hooper

    3.5 stars Originally posted at Fantasy Literature. http://www.fantasyliterature.com/revi... The King’s Justice is the second book in Katherine Kurtz’s THE HISTORIES OF KING KELSON trilogy, which is part of her DERYNI CHRONICLES. It’s the fifth book about young King Kelson. You really ought to read the books in this order: Deryni Rising, Deryni Checkmate, High Deryni, The Bishop’s Heir and THEN this book, The King’s Justice. Kelson is now 17 years old. In the previous book, The Bishop’s Heir, Kelson 3.5 stars Originally posted at Fantasy Literature. http://www.fantasyliterature.com/revi... The King’s Justice is the second book in Katherine Kurtz’s THE HISTORIES OF KING KELSON trilogy, which is part of her DERYNI CHRONICLES. It’s the fifth book about young King Kelson. You really ought to read the books in this order: Deryni Rising, Deryni Checkmate, High Deryni, The Bishop’s Heir and THEN this book, The King’s Justice. Kelson is now 17 years old. In the previous book, The Bishop’s Heir, Kelson and his advisors (Morgan and Duncan) dealt with the rebellion of the province of Meara, which used to be independent. The rebellion was led by a woman who wants Meara to regain its independence and who has a claim to its throne. She was aided by Archbishop Loris, the sadistic escaped rebel priest who persecuted the Deryni. At the end of The Bishop’s Heir, the Mearan prince dealt a brutal personal blow to Kelson. The King’s Justice is essentially part two of the story of the Mearan rebellion. (There’s enough reminder about what happened in The Bishop’s Heir that you don’t need to re-read that book if it’s been a while.) Kelson has vowed revenge for what the Mearan prince did and he plans to get Meara back under his control and rid the world of Archbishop Loris (for good this time). The story begins with Kelson declaring his Uncle Nigel heir until Kelson has his own son. He and Morgan and Duncan then invest Nigel with some of the Haldane powers so Nigel will be able to rule while Kelson is on his campaign against Meara. Much time is spent on the related planning, debates, and ceremonies. During all this, Kelson’s mother shows up. For years she has been sequestered in a convent because she is trying to repent for her use of Deryni powers to save Kelson when he was younger. She has been taught that these powers are evil and she thinks, therefore, that she is evil. A subplot of the story involves her disgust of her own son’s behavior. She hopes to find Kelson a nice wife who will discourage him from using his powers. Another subplot involves Dhugal’s recent discovery about his paternity. As usual, there is a lot of mind-reading, ceremonies, fighting, chasing, captures, rescues, rebellion, assassination attempts, and torture. Even though The King’s Justice is simply a continuation of the story of the previous book, and even though it drags in places (especially the meetings, ceremonies, mind-reading, and torture), I am compelled to read on because I really like Kelson, Morgan, and Duncan and I care what happens to them. Poor Kelson. He’s only 17, his father is dead, his mother is disgusted by him, and the crown weighs so heavy on his head. A lot of the time I think he is too mature and decisive to be believed, but sometimes, as in this book, he does something immature and impetuous and we remember that he’s still a teenager. In a particularly touching scene, Kelson is shaken up when he’s forced to experience rape from a woman’s perspective. It’s easy to resonate with Kelson. I hope we’ll see him happy and secure on his throne someday. Katherine Kurtz’s world and characters feel real. When I read the DERNI CHRONICLES, I feel like I’m actually eating a meal in a medieval castle, watching an archery match, riding through the gates of a fortress, or in the midst of a cavalry charge. If you love that sort of epic fantasy, I recommend this series. I’m listening to the audio versions read by Nick Sullivan and produced by Audible Studios. These are very nice productions. The King’s Justice is 14 hours long.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Altivo Overo

    This sequel to The Bishop's Heir continues to prove the author's mastery of medieval setting and culture. The war against the Mearan pretender Caitrin and her supporters, including the renegade and virulently anti-Deryni archbishop Edmund Loris, is detailed masterfully in this volume. Of course we know that Kelson, King of Gwynedd and rightful ruler of Meara and the neighboring border provinces, can and must prevail. How he does this builds a suspenseful tale with complicated events of treason a This sequel to The Bishop's Heir continues to prove the author's mastery of medieval setting and culture. The war against the Mearan pretender Caitrin and her supporters, including the renegade and virulently anti-Deryni archbishop Edmund Loris, is detailed masterfully in this volume. Of course we know that Kelson, King of Gwynedd and rightful ruler of Meara and the neighboring border provinces, can and must prevail. How he does this builds a suspenseful tale with complicated events of treason and battle. The resolution is decisive but neither pleasant nor happy for many, Kelson included. In a very real sense, this novel relates Kelson's coming of age, in which he is forced to exercise the judgement of a ruler even when his heart would lean toward more merciful conclusions. The story is dark, with more to come. Very fine writing, excellent characters, plenty of pageantry. These novels might easily have made it to the movie screen but would have suffered a tremendous loss of detail in that process. Recommended to lovers of fantasy and/or medieval history and politics. (But do read Kurtz in order. Jumping into the middle would be pretty confusing.)

  4. 5 out of 5

    Bookishnymph *needs hea*

    A 2.5 round-up.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Lisa (Harmonybites)

    The Deryni books are great sword and sorcery fantasy. What makes them unique is that they're a blend of historical fantasy and high fantasy. What marks a book out as high fantasy is a completely imaginary world with no links to real history--legend maybe, but the ties are tenuous, even when like Tolkien's Middle Earth, Lackey's Valdemir or Pierce's Tortall, they have a pseudo-medieval feel. This on, the other hand, is Christian Europe--yet not quite. Gwynedd is recognizably Britain--more so than The Deryni books are great sword and sorcery fantasy. What makes them unique is that they're a blend of historical fantasy and high fantasy. What marks a book out as high fantasy is a completely imaginary world with no links to real history--legend maybe, but the ties are tenuous, even when like Tolkien's Middle Earth, Lackey's Valdemir or Pierce's Tortall, they have a pseudo-medieval feel. This on, the other hand, is Christian Europe--yet not quite. Gwynedd is recognizably Britain--more so than what you see usually see in high fantasy, even if there aren't any real historical parallels to the Haldane dynasty--or the Deryni for that matter, magically talented people who are persecuted by the Church. But more unusually, their "Holy Church" is quite recognizable as the Roman Catholic Church, and the church's beliefs are important to the characters, particularly Bishop Duncan McLain, a Deryni and priest, one of my favorite characters in the series. This isn't like Pullman's His Dark Materials. Kurtz's Holy Church isn't evil, and there are good people within in--and yes, evil ones such as Archbishop Loris. I felt for Jehana, King Kelson's mother, who tries to reconcile her religious convictions with her Deryni heritage. One thing that also makes this series different is that instead of standalone books with a common backdrop, or closely connected books that proceed chronologically, they tend to be grouped into trilogies. The first, The Deryni Chronicles, focused more on Kelson's supporters, Duke Morgan and Bishop McLain. The focus on the "Histories of King Kelson" are naturally on the young king who came to the throne in that first trilogy. I do like how Kelson is developed here. He's an admirable character by and large, but Kurtz doesn't pull her punches about the more ruthless qualities and actions his position brings out in him. I find this a very enjoyable series with characters I cared about.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Sunni

    From the Inside Flap: Young Kelson Haldane, King of Gwynedd, heir to both royal and Deryni magical powers, was still no match for ex-Archbishop Loris and the Pretender Queen Caitrin who sought his death. Yet, he raised an army against them both, knowing that honor made defeat impossible.... (This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.) I have read all of the Deryni books. I am never disappointed by Katherine Kurtz's writing style, and ability to create an entire race From the Inside Flap: Young Kelson Haldane, King of Gwynedd, heir to both royal and Deryni magical powers, was still no match for ex-Archbishop Loris and the Pretender Queen Caitrin who sought his death. Yet, he raised an army against them both, knowing that honor made defeat impossible.... (This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.) I have read all of the Deryni books. I am never disappointed by Katherine Kurtz's writing style, and ability to create an entire race of magical people that are believable as she is able to weave them into a world that the reader may already accept and know. This novel is a great addition to a long running series that I started reading in middle school. I am glad that some new additions are being written to this series after many years, as it is a series that really made an impression on me, and one that I have missed having new material to read from.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Fantasy Literature

    The King’s Justice is the second book in Katherine Kurtz’s THE HISTORIES OF KING KELSON trilogy, which is part of her DERYNI CHRONICLES. It’s the fifth book about young King Kelson. You really ought to read the books in this order: Deryni Rising, Deryni Checkmate, High Deryni, The Bishop’s Heir and THEN this book, The King’s Justice. Kelson is now 17 years old. In the previous book, The Bishop’s Heir, Kelson and his advisors (Morgan and Duncan) dealt with the rebellion of the province of Meara, w The King’s Justice is the second book in Katherine Kurtz’s THE HISTORIES OF KING KELSON trilogy, which is part of her DERYNI CHRONICLES. It’s the fifth book about young King Kelson. You really ought to read the books in this order: Deryni Rising, Deryni Checkmate, High Deryni, The Bishop’s Heir and THEN this book, The King’s Justice. Kelson is now 17 years old. In the previous book, The Bishop’s Heir, Kelson and his advisors (Morgan and Duncan) dealt with the rebellion of the province of Meara, which used to be indepe... Read More: http://www.fantasyliterature.com/revi...

  8. 4 out of 5

    Carol Gibson

    This is the second book in the King Kelson histories. This is one of my favorites. It can be hard to read because it takes place during war. There is torture, rape and people die who really shouldn't. Kelson is maturing as a King and a man but he is far from perfect. Katherine Kurtz has this amazing ability to make this type of medieval faux Earth fantasy really come to life. If you like King Arthur stories and knights and magic then these books are fun reads.

  9. 4 out of 5

    David Zerangue

    This installment was much better than the first of the trilogy. Really enjoyed reading this one. Interested to see how they incorporate the third book into the trilogy as she completed this storyline in the this volume. It'll be the search for Saint Camber but it could probably have been a stand alone. I'll find out soon enough.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    Young Kelson Haldane, King of Gwynedd, heir to both royal and Deryni magical powers, was still no match for ex-Archbishop Loris and the Pretender Queen Caitrin who sought his death. Yet, he raised an army against them both, knowing that honor made defeat impossible.... interesting.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Maggie

    The only thing I didn't like in this book was the descriptions of torture. It's hard to skip when reading, but did some skimming. I like King Kelson and his loyal companions. I look forward to reading about Camber again in the next book.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Phi

    There was a melancholy about the titular justice dispensed in this book, which along with a medieval realism and quasi-catholic society had quite an effect back when I was but a callow youth accustomed to tales of boys adventuring on rocket ships and heroes arriving astride dragons to save the day

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    The king's justice is swift . . . and it has to be. Poor Kelson!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Juliana

    Nicely Written Installment Nicely written installment in the series. Enough action and pathos for a well-rounded tale after a somewhat uneven Book 1.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ina M. Ish

    The King's Justice An excellent tale.Dialog flows smoothly and descriptors are vivid and lush. Ms.Kurtz brings the reader right into the book's action.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Todd

    A good book, Katherine Kurtz writes like the reader has an encyclopedia in front of them written to explain her book..

  17. 4 out of 5

    Arlene Allen

    More great stuff!!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Katherine

    Pretty sure I read this at some point

  19. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    The Histories of King Kelson is an excellent trilogy in the Deryni world. These are some of my favorite books. Love the setting and the psychic abilities.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Alain

    King Kelson finally comes into his own.....'nuff said

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    Being a King at 17 is a difficult burden

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    My favorite of all of Katherine Kurtz's books. Highly recommend!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sam Gordon

    I enjoy reading about the adventures of Kelson and crew. In my opinion, Kurtz is at her best when she's writing within that particular generation of the Deryni. They're some of my favorite reads and I have no doubt I'll read them again and again in the future. I sure can't say the same for most books!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Paca Sad

    I am enjoying this trilogy much more than the initial series, but having hat background has also provided a good insight into this colourful world

  25. 5 out of 5

    Brett

    Fantasy

  26. 5 out of 5

    Cindi

  27. 4 out of 5

    Abner

  28. 4 out of 5

    Julie Blackwood

  29. 4 out of 5

    Dino Bachini

  30. 5 out of 5

    Tasi

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